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70birds

That Nest in Birdhouses

70birds

That Nest in Birdhouses

70birds

That Nest in Birdhouses

Feeding birds will not attract birds to nest and raise a family in a bird house.

Nesting, egg laying birds need seclusion and are unlikely to nest in a bird house near throngs of birds flocking to bird feeders.

 

See each species page for habits, geographic ranges and optimum locations and placement.

 

Even cities have large bird populations that live in birdhouses.

See City Birds

 

Put the right nest boxes in the right place.

Keep nest boxes clean.

Protect birds from pests and predators.

 

Make bird houses with cedar, pine, or almost any soft wood.

Use rough-cut wood stock so that birds can grip wood surfaces.

Always use corrosion resistant screws and hardware.

A hinged roof or side door provides easy access to the interior.

 

Build nest boxes according to species dimensions provided by USGS and USFWS: 1. floor, 2. inside front floor to ceiling, 3. inside floor to top of hole, 4. hole diameter.

Nest boxes made according to those four species-specific dimensions and placed in the right location will attract the intended bird species and possibly additional bird species.

 

Print plans and dimensions or just view them on a phone in your work space.

 

The familiar “nest box” design on these pages follow U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recommended species-specific dimensions that simulate tree cavities in which individual species commonly occupy.

 

Dimension tolerance on a birdhouse, which needs ventilation, is not very critical. Minor measuring or cutting mistakes, gaps, etc. are not always a problem.

Be precise where panels are joined at right angles (90º), the four sides and the floor, where precision is easiest to accomplish. A good fit and fastening there will make for a very sturdy box.

 

Wrens that Nest in Birdhouses

Four wren species nest in boxes in North America. See their geographic ranges, habitats, nesting habits, birdhouse plans, how to build birdhouses and where to install them.

See species information for house wrens
House Wren
Their nests have been found in tree cavities, barns, martin houses, tin cans, jars, planters, hanging clothes, paper bags, hats, shoes, pipes, cars and even old cow, horse, and oxen skulls. They like bird houses. See the wren house page and view or print the wren house plans.
See species information for Carolina wrens
Carolina Wren
Builds bulky nests of leaves, grass, feathers and hair often in shady ravines, wooded and rocky banks of streams, in log piles, brush heaps, natural or abandoned tree cavities and birdhouses. Visit the Carolina wren nest box page and view or print nest box plans.
See species information for Bewick's wrens
Bewick’s Wrens
Builds nests of almost any material, twigs, grass, leaves, paper, moss, bark strips and hair usually low in tree cavities, brush heaps, under bushes and very often in open sheds and also bird houses. See the Bewick’s wren nest box and view or print nest box plans.
Select to read information for winter wren.
Winter Wren
Builds nests of leaves, small twigs, feathers and moss in natural or abandoned tree cavities, broken tree stumps, roots of fallen timber, brush heaps, open buildings and bird houses. Select to visit the winter wren nest box page and view or print nest box plans.

The next two birds below are not in the troglodytidae family of wrens.

See species information for creeper
Brown Creeper
Builds nests by cramming twigs, fine bark strips, feathers, moss and spider cocoons behind the loose bark of dead tree trunks or stumps and in natural or abandoned tree and will also nest in birdhouses. Visit the brown creeper nest box page and view or print nest box plans.
Select to view the prothonotary warbler webpage.
Prothonotary Warbler
Prothonotary warblers build nests in natural or abandoned cavities low to the ground in stumps and up to fifteen feet high in trees overhanging or standing in water. They will also nest in birdhouses. Visit the prothonotary warbler nest box page and view or print nest box plans.
See the wren nest box page, instructions and building plans
Wren Nest Box
Make this nest box for house wrens, winter wrens, Bewick’s wrens, brown creepers and possibly some of the chickadees and nuthatches. See the nest box page, building and mounting instructions and view or print nest box plans.
See the Carolina wren nest box page, instructions and building plans
Carolina Wren Nest Box
Make this nest box specifically for Carolina wrens. Other wrens and chickadees could use this box, however, Carolina wrens need the larger entrance opening. See the nest box page, building and mounting instructions and view or print nest box plans.
 
See the prothonotary warbler nest box page, instructions and building plans
Prothonotary Warbler Nest Box
The dimensions of this nest box are based on observed nesting spaces of prothonotary warblers. Although as usual it could possibly be selected by some of the wrens, chickadees and nuthatches. See the nest box page, building and mounting instructions and view or print nest box plans.
See the Side-Mounted Birdhouse for Chickadees, Wrens, Nuthatches and Titmice
Side-Mounted Nest Box
The volume and 1 3/8″ side entrance hole in this nest box accommodates Chickadees, Nuthatches, Titmice, Wrens and Downy Woodpeckers, yet is normally too small for English Sparrows.  Visit this nest box page and view or print nest box plans.
Visit the swinging wren house page for woodworking plans and instructions
Swinging Wren House

Also consider 70birds’ version of the classic swinging wren house loved by wrens, chickadees and even tree swallows. Suspend with wire, chain or rope or mount on a tree, post or wall with a screw through a keyhole in the back panel. See the Swinging Wren House page and view or print plans.

Wrens that Nest in Birdhouses

Four wren species nest in boxes in North America. See their geographic ranges, habitats, nesting habits, birdhouse plans, how to build birdhouses and where to install them.

See species information for house wrens
House Wren
Their nests have been found in tree cavities, barns, martin houses, tin cans, jars, planters, hanging clothes, paper bags, hats, shoes, pipes, cars and even old cow, horse, and oxen skulls. They like bird houses. See the wren house page and view or print the wren house plans.
See species information for Carolina wrens
Carolina Wren
Builds bulky nests of leaves, grass, feathers and hair often in shady ravines, wooded and rocky banks of streams, in log piles, brush heaps, natural or abandoned tree cavities and birdhouses. Visit the Carolina wren nest box page and view or print nest box plans.
See species information for Bewick's wrens
Bewick’s Wrens
Builds nests of almost any material, twigs, grass, leaves, paper, moss, bark strips and hair usually low in tree cavities, brush heaps, under bushes and very often in open sheds and also bird houses. See the Bewick’s wren nest box and view or print nest box plans.
Select to read information for winter wren.
Winter Wren
Builds nests of leaves, small twigs, feathers and moss in natural or abandoned tree cavities, broken tree stumps, roots of fallen timber, brush heaps, open buildings and bird houses. Select to visit the winter wren nest box page and view or print nest box plans.

The next two birds below are not in the troglodytidae family of wrens.

See species information for creeper
Brown Creeper
Builds nests by cramming twigs, fine bark strips, feathers, moss and spider cocoons behind the loose bark of dead tree trunks or stumps and in natural or abandoned tree and will also nest in birdhouses. Visit the brown creeper nest box page and view or print nest box plans.
Select to view the prothonotary warbler webpage.
Prothonotary Warbler
Prothonotary warblers build nests in natural or abandoned cavities low to the ground in stumps and up to fifteen feet high in trees overhanging or standing in water. They will also nest in birdhouses. Visit the prothonotary warbler nest box page and view or print nest box plans.
See the wren nest box page, instructions and building plans
Wren Nest Box
Make this nest box for house wrens, winter wrens, Bewick’s wrens, brown creepers and possibly some of the chickadees and nuthatches. See the nest box page, building and mounting instructions and view or print nest box plans.
See the Carolina wren nest box page, instructions and building plans
Carolina Wren Nest Box
Make this nest box specifically for Carolina wrens. Other wrens and chickadees could use this box, however, Carolina wrens need the larger entrance opening. See the nest box page, building and mounting instructions and view or print nest box plans.
 
See the prothonotary warbler nest box page, instructions and building plans
Prothonotary Warbler Nest Box
The dimensions of this nest box are based on observed nesting spaces of prothonotary warblers. Although as usual it could possibly be selected by some of the wrens, chickadees and nuthatches. See the nest box page, building and mounting instructions and view or print nest box plans.
See the Side-Mounted Birdhouse for Chickadees, Wrens, Nuthatches and Titmice
Side-Mounted Nest Box
The volume and 1 3/8″ side entrance hole in this nest box accommodates Chickadees, Nuthatches, Titmice, Wrens and Downy Woodpeckers, yet is normally too small for English Sparrows.  Visit this nest box page and view or print nest box plans.
Visit the swinging wren house page for woodworking plans and instructions
Swinging Wren House

Also consider 70birds’ version of the classic swinging wren house loved by wrens, chickadees and even tree swallows. Suspend with wire, chain or rope or mount on a tree, post or wall with a screw through a keyhole in the back panel. See the Swinging Wren House page and view or print plans.

Wrens that Nest in Boxes

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Four wren species nest in boxes in North America and they are one of the easiest birds to attract to nest boxes including in cities. 

See species information for house wrens
House Wren
Their nests have been found in tree cavities, barns, martin houses, tin cans, jars, planters, hanging clothes, paper bags, hats, shoes, pipes, cars and even old cow, horse, and oxen skulls. They like bird houses. See the wren house page and view or print the wren house plans.
See species information for Carolina wrens
Carolina Wren
Builds bulky nests of leaves, grass, feathers and hair often in shady ravines, wooded and rocky banks of streams, in log piles, brush heaps, natural or abandoned tree cavities and birdhouses. Visit the Carolina wren nest box page and view or print nest box plans.
See species information for Bewick's wrens
Bewick’s Wrens
Builds nests of almost any material, twigs, grass, leaves, paper, moss, bark strips and hair usually low in tree cavities, brush heaps, under bushes and very often in open sheds and also bird houses. See the Bewick’s wren nest box and view or print nest box plans.
Select to read information for winter wren.
Winter Wren
Builds nests of leaves, small twigs, feathers and moss in natural or abandoned tree cavities, broken tree stumps, roots of fallen timber, brush heaps, open buildings and bird houses. Select to visit the winter wren nest box page and view or print nest box plans.

The next two birds below are not in the troglodytidae family of wrens.

See species information for creeper
Brown Creeper
Builds nests by cramming twigs, fine bark strips, feathers, moss and spider cocoons behind the loose bark of dead tree trunks or stumps and in natural or abandoned tree and will also nest in birdhouses. Visit the brown creeper nest box page and view or print nest box plans.
Select to view the prothonotary warbler webpage.
Prothonotary Warbler
Prothonotary warblers build nests in natural or abandoned cavities low to the ground in stumps and up to fifteen feet high in trees overhanging or standing in water. They will also nest in birdhouses. Visit the prothonotary warbler nest box page and view or print nest box plans.
See the wren nest box page, instructions and building plans
Wren Nest Box
Make this nest box for house wrens, winter wrens, Bewick’s wrens, brown creepers and possibly some of the chickadees and nuthatches. See the nest box page, building and mounting instructions and view or print nest box plans.
See the Carolina wren nest box page, instructions and building plans
Carolina Wren Birdhouse
Make this nest box specifically for Carolina wrens. Other wrens and chickadees could use this box, however, Carolina wrens need the larger entrance opening. See the nest box page, building and mounting instructions and view or print nest box plans.
 
See the prothonotary warbler nest box page, instructions and building plans
Prothonotary Warbler Nest Box
The dimensions of this nest box are based on observed nesting spaces of prothonotary warblers. Although as usual it could possibly be selected by some of the wrens, chickadees and nuthatches. See the nest box page, building and mounting instructions and view or print nest box plans.
See the Side-Mounted Birdhouse for Chickadees, Wrens, Nuthatches and Titmice
Side-Mounted Nest Box
The volume and 1 3/8″ side entrance hole in this nest box accommodates Chickadees, Nuthatches, Titmice, Wrens and Downy Woodpeckers, yet is normally too small for English Sparrows.  Visit this nest box page and view or print nest box plans.
Visit the swinging wren house page for woodworking plans and instructions
Swinging Wren House
70birds’ version of the classic swinging wren house loved by wrens, chickadees and even tree swallows. Suspend with wire, chain or rope or mount on a tree, post or wall with a screw through a keyhole in the back panel. See the Swinging Wren House page and view or print plans.

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