70birds

That Nest in Birdhouses

70birds

That Nest in Birdhouses

70birds

That Nest in Birdhouses

Prothonotary Warbler

Protonotaria citrea

Order: Passeriformes
Family: Parulidae
Genus: Protonotaria
Species: citrea

La. passer sparrow, small bird
La. forma form, kind, species
La. parus a tit (small bird)
La. -idae appearance, resemblance

Gr. photos first
La. notarius secretary (the Chief Secretary of the Chancery in Rome wore yellow)
La. citreus of the citrus tree
La. critron yellow

About five inches long with radiant colors. Conspicuous black eyes and beak stand out from the rich orange head. Orange neck, throat and breast with lighter belly. Greenish yellow back. Blue-gray wings and tail.

Prothonotary warblers inhabit woodland bordered swamps, ponds and stream bottom lands east of the Great Plains from the Gulf States along the Mississippi Valley to Minnesota, and the lower Great Lakes States, to the eastern seaboard from Florida to New York, occasionally as far north as Maine. They winter in Central America, the Caribbean and northern South America.

Prothonotary warblers are often best observed in their habitats from a canoe. They forage in bushes, low trees and other thick foliage, often willow and cypress trees over water for flies, midges, moths, beetles, ants, grasshoppers and various other insects, snails and various seeds. Fruits are added to their diet when they are in their wintering grounds.

Prothonotary warblers build nests of twigs, bark, leaves, shredded plants, grass and moss. They select natural cavities or cavities chipped out, inhabited and abandoned by woodpeckers or chickadees low to the ground in decaying stumps and up to fifteen feet high in trees overhanging or standing in water.

Females lay four to seven creamy-white speckled eggs which hatch after about two weeks incubation and young leave the nest in about another two weeks.

The Prothonotary Warbler Birdhouse has a 5″ by 5″ floor, 6″ inside floor to ceiling, 1 1/8″ diameter entrance hole located 5″ above the floor and ventilation openings.

Use wood stock rough-cut on both sides so birds can grip. Assemble with corrosion resistant screws.

Drill countersunk pilot holes in primary work pieces and regular pilot holes in secondary work pieces to reduce wood splitting.

Attach the roof with hinges and lock in a closed position with shutter hooks.

Mount on a tree, stump, or post over water from waist level up to just out of reach.

Installations at significant heights should be installed and maintained by professionals, carpenters, electricians, power line workers, etc.

Remove the nest and clean the box after the brood rearing season is past.

Prothonotary Warbler Birdhouse

Prothonotary Warbler Birdhouse Plans

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Prothonotary Warbler

Protonotaria citrea

Order: Passeriformes
Family: Parulidae
Genus: Protonotaria
Species: citrea

La. passer sparrow, small bird
La. forma form, kind, species
La. parus a tit (small bird)
La. -idae appearance, resemblance

Gr. photos first
La. notarius secretary (the Chief Secretary of the Chancery in Rome wore yellow)
La. citreus of the citrus tree
La. critron yellow

About five inches long with radiant colors. Conspicuous black eyes and beak stand out from the rich orange head. Orange neck, throat and breast with lighter belly. Greenish yellow back. Blue-gray wings and tail.

Prothonotary warblers inhabit woodland bordered swamps, ponds and stream bottom lands east of the Great Plains from the Gulf States along the Mississippi Valley to Minnesota, and the lower Great Lakes States, to the eastern seaboard from Florida to New York, occasionally as far north as Maine and Ontario. They winter in Central America, the Caribbean and northern South America.

Prothonotary warblers are often best observed in their habitats from a canoe. They forage in bushes, low trees and other thick foliage, often willow and cypress trees over water for flies, midges, moths, beetles, ants, grasshoppers and various other insects, snails and various seeds. Fruits are added to their diet when they are in their wintering grounds.

Prothonotary warblers build nests of twigs, bark, leaves, shredded plants, grass and moss. They select natural cavities or cavities chipped out, inhabited and abandoned by woodpeckers or chickadees low to the ground in decaying stumps and up to fifteen feet high in trees overhanging or standing in water.

Females lay four to seven creamy-white speckled eggs which hatch after about two weeks incubation and young leave the nest in about another two weeks.

The Prothonotary Warbler Birdhouse has a 5″ by 5″ floor, 6″ inside floor to ceiling, 1 1/8″ diameter entrance hole located 5″ above the floor and ventilation openings in the floor and sides near the top.

Use wood stock rough-cut on both sides so birds can grip. Assemble with corrosion resistant screws.

Drill countersunk pilot holes in primary work pieces and regular pilot holes in secondary work pieces to reduce wood splitting.

Attach the roof with hinges and lock in a closed position with shutter hooks.

Mount on a tree, stump, or post over water from waist level up to just out of reach.

Installations at significant heights should be installed and maintained by professionals, carpenters, electricians, power line workers, etc.

Remove the nest and clean the box after the brood rearing season is past.

Prothonotary Warbler Birdhouse

Prothonotary Warbler Birdhouse Plans

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Prothonotary Warbler

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Protonotaria citrea

Order: Passeriformes
Family: Parulidae
Genus: Protonotaria
Species: citrea

La. passer sparrow, small bird
La. forma form, kind, species
La. parus a tit (small bird)
La. -idae appearance, resemblance

Gr. photos first
La. notarius secretary (the Chief Secretary of the Chancery in Rome wore yellow)
La. citreus of the citrus tree
La. critron yellow

About five inches long with radiant colors. Conspicuous black eyes and beak stand out from the rich orange head. Orange neck, throat and breast with lighter belly. Greenish yellow back. Blue-gray wings and tail.

Prothonotary warblers inhabit woodland bordered swamps, ponds and stream bottom lands east of the Great Plains from the Gulf States along the Mississippi Valley to Minnesota, and the lower Great Lakes States, to the eastern seaboard from Florida to New York, occasionally as far north as Maine and Ontario. They winter in Central America, the Caribbean and northern South America.

Prothonotary warblers are often best observed in their habitats from a canoe.

They forage in bushes, low trees and other thick foliage, often willow and cypress trees over water for flies, midges, moths, beetles, ants, grasshoppers and various other insects, snails and various seeds.

Fruits are added to their diet when they are in their wintering grounds.

Prothonotary warblers build nests of twigs, bark, leaves, shredded plants, grass and moss.

They select natural cavities or cavities chipped out, inhabited and abandoned by woodpeckers or chickadees low to the ground in decaying stumps and up to fifteen feet high in trees overhanging or standing in water.

Females lay four to seven creamy-white speckled eggs which hatch after about two weeks incubation and young leave the nest in about another two weeks.

The Prothonotary Warbler Birdhouse has a 5″ by 5″ floor, 6″ inside floor to ceiling, 1 1/8″ diameter entrance hole located 5″ above the floor and ventilation openings in the floor and sides near the top.

Prothonotary Warbler Birdhouse

Use wood stock rough-cut on both sides so birds can grip. Assemble with corrosion resistant screws.

Drill countersunk pilot holes in primary work pieces and regular pilot holes in secondary work pieces to reduce wood splitting.

Attach the roof with hinges and lock in a closed position with shutter hooks.

Prothonotary Warbler Birdhouse Plans

Mount on a tree, stump, or post over water from waist level up to just out of reach.

Installations at significant heights should be installed and maintained by professionals, carpenters, electricians, power line workers, etc.

Remove the nest and clean the box after the brood rearing season is past.

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