Phoebes & Flycatchers

 

Two phoebe species nest on platform shelters. Another makes mud nests like barn and cliff swallows. Flycatchers nest in birdhouses. They all catch insects in flight and are fun to watch.

Visit the great-crested flycatcher species page.
Great-crested Flycatcher
Great-crested flycatchers chase wasps, flies, moths and other flying insects. They build bulky nests of twigs, grass, rootlets, feathers and snake skins in natural or abandoned tree cavities and in birdhouses. They are often found nesting in boxes intended for bluebirds and purple martins. See the great-crested flycatcher nest box and view or print nest box plans.
Visit the ash-throated flycatcher species page.
Ash-throated Flycatcher

Ash-throated flycatchers catch flies, wasps, moths and other insects in flight and also eat fruit. They build nests in natural or abandoned tree cavities in deep shady forests and deserts. They will also nest in the right sized birdhouse in the right place. Visit the ash-throated flycatcher nest box page and view or print nest box plans.

See species information for eastern phoebes
Eastern Phoebe

Eastern phoebes make nests of twigs, roots and moss, cemented with mud, lined with grass, hair, and feathers. They like to nest in woodlands near wetlands. Also on house ledges under eaves, in farm buildings, on and under bridge beams, or cliff protrusions. Their nests have been found in culverts, caves, wells, freight train cars and even a ferry that was in use. Visit the phoebe platform shelter page and view or print platform shelter plans.

Visit the Say's phoebe species page.
Say’s Phoebe
Say’s phoebes build nests of sticks, grass, moss, hair and spider webs in tree hollows, caves, rock crevices. They also nest in farm out buildings, on ledges under home porch roofs and on shelter platforms. See the phoebe platform shelter page and view or print platform shelter plans.
Visit the black phoebe species page.
Black Phoebe
Black phoebes build mud and grass nests always under something on a wall, bridge or cliff often directly over, or near water on farms, in towns and some still in natural formations in California river valleys, its original habitat. See the black phoebe shelter page and view or print shelter plans.

Nest Boxes & Platforms, Plans & How-to

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Phoebes & Flycatchers

 

Two phoebe species nest on platform shelters. Another makes mud nests like barn and cliff swallows. Flycatchers nest in birdhouses. They all catch insects in flight and are fun to watch.

Visit the great-crested flycatcher species page.
Great-crested Flycatcher
Great-crested flycatchers chase wasps, flies, moths and other flying insects. They build bulky nests of twigs, grass, rootlets, feathers and snake skins in natural or abandoned tree cavities and in birdhouses. They are often found nesting in boxes intended for bluebirds and purple martins. See the great-crested flycatcher nest box and view or print nest box plans.
Visit the ash-throated flycatcher species page.
Ash-throated Flycatcher

Ash-throated flycatchers catch flies, wasps, moths and other insects in flight and also eat fruit. They build nests in natural or abandoned tree cavities in deep shady forests and deserts. They will also nest in the right sized birdhouse in the right place. Visit the ash-throated flycatcher nest box page and view or print nest box plans.

See species information for eastern phoebes
Eastern Phoebe

Eastern phoebes make nests of twigs, roots and moss, cemented with mud, lined with grass, hair, and feathers. They like to nest in woodlands near wetlands. Also on house ledges under eaves, in farm buildings, on and under bridge beams, or cliff protrusions. Their nests have been found in culverts, caves, wells, freight train cars and even a ferry that was in use. Visit the phoebe platform shelter page and view or print platform shelter plans.

Visit the Say's phoebe species page.
Say’s Phoebe
Say’s phoebes build nests of sticks, grass, moss, hair and spider webs in tree hollows, caves, rock crevices. They also nest in farm out buildings, on ledges under home porch roofs and on shelter platforms. See the phoebe platform shelter page and view or print platform shelter plans.
Visit the black phoebe species page.
Black Phoebe
Black phoebes build mud and grass nests always under something on a wall, bridge or cliff often directly over, or near water on farms, in towns and some still in natural formations in California river valleys, its original habitat. See the black phoebe shelter page and view or print shelter plans.

Nest Boxes & Platforms, Plans & How-to

Birds  |  Birdhouses  |  Plans  |  Forum

Phoebes & Flycatchers

Two phoebe species nest on platform shelters. Another makes mud nests like barn and cliff swallows. Flycatchers nest in birdhouses. They all catch insects in flight and are fun to watch.

Visit the great-crested flycatcher species page.
Great-crested Flycatcher
Great-crested flycatchers chase wasps, flies, moths and other flying insects. They build bulky nests of twigs, grass, rootlets, feathers and snake skins in natural or abandoned tree cavities and in birdhouses. They are often found nesting in boxes intended for bluebirds and purple martins.
Visit the ash-throated flycatcher species page.
Ash-throated Flycatcher
Ash-throated flycatchers catch flies, wasps, moths and other insects in flight and also eat fruit. They build nests in natural or abandoned tree cavities in deep shady forests and deserts. They will also nest in the right sized birdhouse in the right place.
See species information for eastern phoebes
Eastern Phoebe
Eastern phoebes make nests of twigs, roots and moss, cemented with mud, lined with grass, hair, and feathers. They like to nest in woodlands near wetlands. Also on house ledges under eaves, in farm buildings, on and under bridge beams, or cliff protrusions. Their nests have been found in culverts, caves, wells, freight train cars and even a ferry that was in use.
Visit the Say's phoebe species page.
Say’s Phoebe
Say’s phoebes build nests of sticks, grass, moss, hair and spider webs in tree hollows, caves, rock crevices. They also nest in farm out buildings, on ledges under home porch roofs and on shelter platforms.
Visit the black phoebe species page.
Black Phoebe
Black phoebes build mud and grass nests always under something on a wall, bridge or cliff often directly over, or near water on farms, in towns and some still in natural formations in California river valleys, its original habitat.

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