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70birds

That Nest in Birdhouses

70birds

That Nest in Birdhouses

70birds

That Nest in Birdhouses

See each species page for habits, geographic ranges and optimum locations and placement.

 

Nest boxes simulate tree cavities.

Some birds that nest in tree cavities will also nest inside wood nest boxes if they are the right size.

Some birds that nest on tree branches, cliffs, and rock ledges will also nest on wood platforms.

Birds like birdhouses to be in their favorite places.

 

Too many bird houses can drive off nesting birds, including a specific bird species we want to attract.

For most yards, select just one or two bird species that are known to nest in bird houses in that region.

 

Even cities have large bird populations that live in birdhouses.

See City Birds

 

Always use corrosion resistant screws and hardware. Drill countersunk pilot holes in primary work pieces (first piece the screw is inserted into). Drill regular pilot holes in secondary work pieces.

 

Hinges are suggested for easy access. Other methods for attaching roofs are just as good. However, most nest boxes are mounted out of reach for most people.

Birdhouse mounting, monitoring and maintenance on ladders are awkward chores that require “three hands”. Convenience increases safety when working at heights.

 

Clean and disinfect nest boxes with a 5% bleach and 95% water mix after the brooding season to prevent spread of disease and parasites. Use rubber gloves, eye protection, spray bottles, and sponges to completely saturate nest box interiors.

 

You may prefer Side Opening Doors instead of hinged roof doors, especially for the larger nest boxes.

 

Phoebes & Flycatchers

Two phoebe species nest on platform shelters. Another makes mud nests like barn and cliff swallows. Flycatchers nest in birdhouses. They all catch insects in flight and are fun to watch.

Visit the great-crested flycatcher species page.
Great-crested Flycatcher
Great-crested flycatchers chase wasps, flies, moths and other flying insects. They build bulky nests of twigs, grass, rootlets, feathers and snake skins in natural or abandoned tree cavities and in birdhouses. They are often found nesting in boxes intended for bluebirds and purple martins. See the great-crested flycatcher nest box and view or print nest box plans.
Visit the ash-throated flycatcher species page.
Ash-throated Flycatcher

Ash-throated flycatchers catch flies, wasps, moths and other insects in flight and also eat fruit. They build nests in natural or abandoned tree cavities in deep shady forests and deserts. They will also nest in the right sized birdhouse in the right place. Visit the ash-throated flycatcher nest box page and view or print nest box plans.

See species information for eastern phoebes
Eastern Phoebe

Eastern phoebes make nests of twigs, roots and moss, cemented with mud, lined with grass, hair, and feathers. They like to nest in woodlands near wetlands. Also on house ledges under eaves, in farm buildings, on and under bridge beams, or cliff protrusions. Their nests have been found in culverts, caves, wells, freight train cars and even a ferry that was in use. Visit the phoebe platform shelter page and view or print platform shelter plans.

Visit the Say's phoebe species page.
Say’s Phoebe
Say’s phoebes build nests of sticks, grass, moss, hair and spider webs in tree hollows, caves, rock crevices. They also nest in farm out buildings, on ledges under home porch roofs and on shelter platforms. See the phoebe platform shelter page and view or print platform shelter plans.
Visit the black phoebe species page.
Black Phoebe
Black phoebes build mud and grass nests always under something on a wall, bridge or cliff often directly over, or near water on farms, in towns and some still in natural formations in California river valleys, its original habitat. See the black phoebe shelter page and view or print shelter plans.

Nest Boxes & Platforms, Plans & How-to

Phoebes & Flycatchers

Two phoebe species nest on platform shelters. Another makes mud nests like barn and cliff swallows. Flycatchers nest in birdhouses. They all catch insects in flight and are fun to watch.

Visit the great-crested flycatcher species page.
Great-crested Flycatcher
Great-crested flycatchers chase wasps, flies, moths and other flying insects. They build bulky nests of twigs, grass, rootlets, feathers and snake skins in natural or abandoned tree cavities and in birdhouses. They are often found nesting in boxes intended for bluebirds and purple martins. See the great-crested flycatcher nest box and view or print nest box plans.
Visit the ash-throated flycatcher species page.
Ash-throated Flycatcher

Ash-throated flycatchers catch flies, wasps, moths and other insects in flight and also eat fruit. They build nests in natural or abandoned tree cavities in deep shady forests and deserts. They will also nest in the right sized birdhouse in the right place. Visit the ash-throated flycatcher nest box page and view or print nest box plans.

See species information for eastern phoebes
Eastern Phoebe

Eastern phoebes make nests of twigs, roots and moss, cemented with mud, lined with grass, hair, and feathers. They like to nest in woodlands near wetlands. Also on house ledges under eaves, in farm buildings, on and under bridge beams, or cliff protrusions. Their nests have been found in culverts, caves, wells, freight train cars and even a ferry that was in use. Visit the phoebe platform shelter page and view or print platform shelter plans.

Visit the Say's phoebe species page.
Say’s Phoebe
Say’s phoebes build nests of sticks, grass, moss, hair and spider webs in tree hollows, caves, rock crevices. They also nest in farm out buildings, on ledges under home porch roofs and on shelter platforms. See the phoebe platform shelter page and view or print platform shelter plans.
Visit the black phoebe species page.
Black Phoebe
Black phoebes build mud and grass nests always under something on a wall, bridge or cliff often directly over, or near water on farms, in towns and some still in natural formations in California river valleys, its original habitat. See the black phoebe shelter page and view or print shelter plans.

Nest Boxes & Platforms, Plans & How-to

Phoebes & Flycatchers

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Two phoebe species nest on platform shelters. Another makes mud nests like barn and cliff swallows. Flycatchers nest in birdhouses. They all catch insects in flight and are fun to watch.

Visit the great-crested flycatcher species page.
Great-crested Flycatcher
Great-crested flycatchers chase wasps, flies, moths and other flying insects. They build bulky nests of twigs, grass, rootlets, feathers and snake skins in natural or abandoned tree cavities and in birdhouses. They are often found nesting in boxes intended for bluebirds and purple martins.
Visit the ash-throated flycatcher species page.
Ash-throated Flycatcher
Ash-throated flycatchers catch flies, wasps, moths and other insects in flight and also eat fruit. They build nests in natural or abandoned tree cavities in deep shady forests and deserts. They will also nest in the right sized birdhouse in the right place.
See species information for eastern phoebes
Eastern Phoebe
Eastern phoebes make nests of twigs, roots and moss, cemented with mud, lined with grass, hair, and feathers. They like to nest in woodlands near wetlands. Also on house ledges under eaves, in farm buildings, on and under bridge beams, or cliff protrusions. Their nests have been found in culverts, caves, wells, freight train cars and even a ferry that was in use.
Visit the Say's phoebe species page.
Say’s Phoebe
Say’s phoebes build nests of sticks, grass, moss, hair and spider webs in tree hollows, caves, rock crevices. They also nest in farm out buildings, on ledges under home porch roofs and on shelter platforms.
Visit the black phoebe species page.
Black Phoebe
Black phoebes build mud and grass nests always under something on a wall, bridge or cliff often directly over, or near water on farms, in towns and some still in natural formations in California river valleys, its original habitat.

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