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70birds

Birdhouse Index

70birds

Birdhouse Index

70birds

Birdhouse Index

Always use corrosion resistant screws and hardware. Drill countersunk pilot holes in primary work pieces (first piece the screw is inserted into). Drill regular pilot holes in secondary work pieces.

 

You may prefer Side Opening Doors instead of hinged roof doors, especially for the larger nest boxes.

 

You shouldn’t have to pay for any wood if you keep your eyes peeled. Watch for wood scrap piles at fence and home construction sites. These are good sources for the small sizes usually needed for bird houses.

 

Use a hand held screwdriver to assemble work pieces. This allows the crafts person to feel and better judge appropriate hole sizes and snugness to prevent stripping and splitting wood.

 

Open Nesting Platform

The open nesting platform can be used under porches, eaves and other open shelters.

It’s possible any of the platform nesters could use this platform, depending where it’s mounted and each individual species inclination.

Open nesting platform for robins, phoebes, mourning doves, bluejays, song sparrows, catbirds, brown thrashers and house finches.

Make from cedar, pine, or almost any softwood. Always use corrosion resistant screws and other hardware.

Drill countersunk pilot holes in primary work pieces (first work piece in which screws are inserted) and regular pilot holes in secondary work pieces. This reduces a tendency for wood to split and makes for easy assembly in minutes with a power or hand held screwdriver.

View and print open nesting platform plans.

​Some birds nest on platforms mounted on the sides of a garages and sheds over looking backyard spaces. Sometimes platform nesters utilize ledges under the shelter of a porch roofs or eaves.

This open platform may be useful in those places. Or for example, if birds nest on window ledges under a porch roof and make a mess on the porch floor, you may be able attract them to an open platform mounted somewhere else under an eave.

More than a century ago, Gilbert H. Trafton recommended platforms open on all four sides in low bushes for thrashers, catbirds and song sparrows. More recently some wildlife conservation brochures included similar recommendations, but they were removed for lack of documentation. These birds seem to thrive without much assistance. Nevertheless, birds continue to surprise

Birds that May Nest on this Platform

Visit the American robin species page.
Visit the blue jay species page.
Visit the mourning dove species page.
Visit the Say's phoebe species page.
Visit the eastern phoebe species page.
Visit the house finch species page.
Visit the song sparrow species page.
Visit the catbird species page.
Visit the brown thrasher species page.

Open Nesting Platform

The open nesting platform can be used under porches, eaves and other open shelters.

It’s possible any of the platform nesters could use this platform, depending where it’s mounted and each individual species inclination.

Open nesting platform for robins, phoebes, mourning doves, bluejays, song sparrows, catbirds, brown thrashers and house finches.

Make from cedar, pine, or almost any softwood. Always use corrosion resistant screws and other hardware.

Drill countersunk pilot holes in primary work pieces (first work piece in which screws are inserted) and regular pilot holes in secondary work pieces. This reduces a tendency for wood to split and makes for easy assembly in minutes with a power or hand held screwdriver.

View and print open nesting platform plans.

Some birds nest on platforms mounted on the sides of a garages and sheds over looking backyard spaces. Sometimes platform nesters utilize ledges under the shelter of a porch roofs or eaves.

This open platform may be useful in those places. Or for example, if birds nest on window ledges under a porch roof and make a mess on the porch floor, you may be able attract them to an open platform mounted somewhere else under an eave.

More than a century ago, Gilbert H. Trafton recommended platforms open on all four sides in low bushes for thrashers, catbirds and song sparrows. More recently some wildlife conservation brochures included similar recommendations, but they were removed for lack of documentation. These birds seem to thrive without much assistance. Nevertheless, birds continue to surprise

Birds that May Nest on this Platform

Visit the American robin species page.
Visit the blue jay species page.
Visit the mourning dove species page.
Visit the Say's phoebe species page.
Visit the eastern phoebe species page.
Visit the house finch species page.
Visit the song sparrow species page.
Visit the catbird species page.
Visit the brown thrasher species page.

Open Nesting Platform

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Open nesting platform for robins, phoebes, mourning doves, bluejays, song sparrows, catbirds, brown thrashers and house finches.

The open nesting platform can be used under porches, eaves and other open shelters.

It’s possible any of the platform nesters could use this platform, depending where it’s mounted and each individual species inclination.

Make from cedar, pine, or almost any softwood. Always use corrosion resistant screws and other hardware.

Drill countersunk pilot holes in primary work pieces (first work piece in which screws are inserted) and regular pilot holes in secondary work pieces. This reduces a tendency for wood to split and makes for easy assembly in minutes with a power or hand held screwdriver.

View and print open nesting platform plans.

Some birds nest on platforms mounted on the sides of a garages and sheds over looking backyard spaces. Sometimes platform nesters utilize ledges under the shelter of a porch roofs or eaves.

This open platform may be useful in those places. Or for example, if birds nest on window ledges under a porch roof and make a mess on the porch floor, you may be able attract them to an open platform mounted somewhere else under an eave.

More than a century ago, Gilbert H. Trafton recommended platforms open on all four sides in low bushes for thrashers, catbirds and song sparrows.

More recently some wildlife conservation brochures included similar recommendations, but they were removed for lack of documentation. These birds seem to thrive without much assistance. Nevertheless, birds continue to surprise

Birds that May Nest on this Platform

Visit the American robin species page.
Visit the blue jay species page.
Visit the mourning dove species page.
Visit the Say's phoebe species page.
Visit the eastern phoebe species page.
Visit the house finch species page.
Visit the song sparrow species page.
Visit the catbird species page.
Visit the brown thrasher species page.

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