Ash-throated Flycatcher

Myiarchus: Lord of the Flies

Order: Passeriformes
Family: Tyrannidae
Genus: Myiarchus
Species: cinerascens

La. passer sparrow, small bird
La. forma form, kind, species
Gr. turannos tyrant
La. tyrannus tyrant, despot king
La. -idae appearance, resemblance
Gr. muia a fly
Gr. arkhos lord, prince
La. cinis ashes, embers

About seven inches long. Brown upper parts and tail with white bars on the wings. Pale gray throat and breast. Yellow underside. Brownish upper, darker finely barred wings and tail.

Ash-throated flycatcher perched on a twig.
Inhabits forests throughout the Southwest from Texas to the Pacific, north to Oregon, Nevada, Utah and Colorado and south over the Mexican highlands to northern Central America.
Ash-throated flycatchers range southwestern US from Texas west to the West Coast to Oregon
Catches insects in flight and also eats fruit.

Builds nests in natural or abandoned tree cavities in deep shady forests and deserts.

Females lay three to seven, usually four buff brown eggs with brown longitudinal lines. Eggs hatch after about two weeks incubation and young leave the nest in about another two weeks.
The Ash-throated Flycatcher Birdhouse has a 6″ by 6″ floor, 9″ inside floor to ceiling, 1 1/2″ diameter entrance hole located 7″ above the floor and ventilation openings.

Fix the roof with hinges and lock in a closed position with shutter hooks. Some prefer a fixed roof with a Side Opening Door.

Use wood stock rough cut on both sides. Assemble with corrosion resistant screws fit to pre-drilled countersunk pilot holes to reduce splitting wood.

Mount this box on tree or post in a secluded area in the forest, field edge, or near a stream between four and ten feet high with partial sun & shade.

Remove the nest and clean the box after the brood rearing season is over.

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Ash-throated Flycatcher

Myiarchus: Lord of the Flies

Ash-throated flycatcher perched on a twig.
Order: Passeriformes
Family: Tyrannidae
Genus: Myiarchus
Species: cinerascens

La. passer sparrow, small bird
La. forma form, kind, species
Gr. turannos tyrant
La. tyrannus tyrant, despot king
La. -idae appearance, resemblance
Gr. muia a fly
Gr. arkhos lord, prince
La. cinis ashes, embers

About seven inches long. Brown upper parts and tail with white bars on the wings. Pale gray throat and breast. Yellow underside. Brownish upper, darker finely barred wings and tail.

Inhabits forests throughout the Southwest from Texas to the Pacific, north to Oregon, Nevada, Utah and Colorado and south over the Mexican highlands to northern Central America.
Ash-throated flycatchers range southwestern US from Texas west to the West Coast to Oregon
Catches insects in flight and also eats fruit.

Builds nests in natural or abandoned tree cavities in deep shady forests and deserts.

Females lay three to seven, usually four buff brown eggs with brown longitudinal lines. Eggs hatch after about two weeks incubation and young leave the nest in about another two weeks.

 

Select to print or view Ash-throated Flycatcher nest box plans.
The Ash-throated Flycatcher Birdhouse has a 6″ by 6″ floor, 9″ inside floor to ceiling, 1 1/2″ diameter entrance hole located 7″ above the floor and ventilation openings.

Fix the roof with hinges and lock in a closed position with shutter hooks. Some prefer a fixed roof with a Side Opening Door.

Use wood stock rough cut on both sides. Assemble with corrosion resistant screws fit to pre-drilled countersunk pilot holes to reduce splitting wood.

Mount this box on tree or post in a secluded area in the forest, field edge, or near a stream between four and ten feet high with partial sun & shade. Remove the nest and clean the box after the brood rearing season is over.

Swallows, chickadees, titmice, nuthatches and woodpeckers may also use these boxes.

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