70birds

Birdhouse Plans Index

70birds

Birdhouse Plans Index

70birds

Birdhouse Plans Index

Raptors that Nest in Boxes & Platforms

Nine owl species, two falcons, a hawk and ospreys nest in boxes or platforms. See their geographic ranges, their habitats, nesting habits, birdhouse plans, how to build birdhouses and where to install them.

See species information for the Great Horned Owl
Great Horned Owl
Great horned owls build nests high in trees (as high as 100 feet) of sticks, twigs, bark and feathers in cavities, cliff ledges, other hawk or eagle nests and will also nest on specially made platforms. Visit the great horned owl nesting platform page and view or print the platform plans.
See species information for the barred owl
Barred Owl
Barred owls hoot with an almost human like deep-toned voice. They often respond to an imitation of their call, try it. They nest in natural or abandoned tree cavities, abandoned crow or hawk nests and will also nest in birdhouses. See the barred owl nest box page and view or print nest box plans.
Select to read information for the eastern screech owl.
Eastern Screech Owl
Screech owls prey on mice, insects, frogs, snakes, lizards, crayfish and fish. They nest in natural or abandoned tree cavities, sometimes in barns, sheds and in nest boxes. Visit the eastern screech owl nest box page and view or print nest box plans.
Select to read species information for the western screech owl
Western Screech Owl
If you fear the dark, you will certainly appreciate the screech owl’s eerie, shivering nighttime wail. They nest in tree cavities, on rocky ledges, in farm sheds and in birdhouses. Visit the Western Screech Owl nest box page and view or print nest box plans.
Read species information for the pygmy owl
Pygmy Owl
Unlike other owls, pygmy owls are day hunters of small birds, rodents, reptiles and insects. They build nests in natural or abandoned tree cavities up to seventy five feet high and in nest boxes. Visit the pygmy owl nest box page and print nest box plans.
See species information for the boreal owl
Boreal Owl
Boreal owls are night hunters of small mammals and lesser quantities of birds. They nest in tree cavities and will also nest in birdhouses. Visit the boreal owl nest box page and view or print nest box plans.
See species information for the hawk owl
Hawk Owl
Has hawk like habits. Eats grouse, rodents, and insects. Hawk owls build nests in evergreen trees, in natural and abandoned tree cavities, sometimes in old hawk nests and in bird boxes too. Visit the hawk owl’s nest box page and view or print nest box plans.
Visit the species information page for saw-whet owl
Saw-whet Owls

Forages for beetles, ants, and grasshoppers, corn, acorns, berries and other wild fruit. Builds nests in cavities it excavates in trees, telephone poles, or fence posts and also nests in birdhouses. See the saw-whet owl nest box page and view or print nest box plans.

See species information for the barn owl
Barn Owl
Barn owls eat mice, rats and other mammals, insects, frogs, some birds, rarely poultry. They nest in tree hollows, deserted buildings, barns, boat wrecks, church towers, holes in banks, even holes in the open prairies. They also nest in large boxes in the right place.
See species information for the Kestrel
American Kestrel
The American kestrel builds no nest. It deposits its eggs in the natural or abandoned cavities of high trees and deserted magpie nests. Or in rock crevices and stone quarries and holes high in river banks. Near people in nooks of farm buildings and in cities in tall buildings like church steeples. They will also nest in the right size nest box in the right place. Visit the American kestrel nest box page and view or print the birdhouse plans.
See species information for the peregrine falcon
Peregrine Falcon
In the wild, peregrine falcons have generally nested on high, cliff edges, usually under some kind of overhang. They scrape out an area but add no nesting materials. In recent times, increasing numbers of peregrines nest on tall buildings, bridges and other structures in cities. Sometimes their nests on buildings are assisted by experts which may require training, qualification and licensing. These activities are generally regulated by Federal and State law.
Visit the red-tailed hawk species page
Red-tailed Hawk
Red-tailed hawks build nests high in trees, often more than 50 feet high. They use large sticks lined with smaller twigs, strips of bark, and its own feathers. Sometimes use a nest for many years. Sometimes red-tailed hawks will nest on a high mounted platform made especially for them. Visit the owl-hawk-osprey nesting platform page and view or print the nesting platform plans.
Visit the osprey species page.
Osprey
Ospreys build huge nests, often near other Osprey nests. They use large sticks, bones, seaweed, other bird nests and even old shoes. They nest in trees from ten to seventy five feet high, on the ground in colonies on isolated islands, and in parks and refuges. Residents of many towns accommodate ospreys with platforms. Visit the owl-hawk-osprey nesting platform page and view or print the platform plans.

Raptors that Nest in Boxes & Platforms

Nine owl species, two falcons, a hawk and ospreys nest in boxes or platforms. See their geographic ranges, their habitats, nesting habits, birdhouse plans, how to build birdhouses and where to install them.

See species information for the Great Horned Owl
Great Horned Owl
Great horned owls build nests high in trees (as high as 100 feet) of sticks, twigs, bark and feathers in cavities, cliff ledges, other hawk or eagle nests and will also nest on specially made platforms. Visit the great horned owl nesting platform page and view or print the platform plans.
See species information for the barred owl
Barred Owl
Barred owls hoot with an almost human like deep-toned voice. They often respond to an imitation of their call, try it. They nest in natural or abandoned tree cavities, abandoned crow or hawk nests and will also nest in birdhouses. See the barred owl nest box page and view or print nest box plans.
Select to read information for the eastern screech owl.
Eastern Screech Owl
Screech owls prey on mice, insects, frogs, snakes, lizards, crayfish and fish. They nest in natural or abandoned tree cavities, sometimes in barns, sheds and in nest boxes. Visit the eastern screech owl nest box page and view or print nest box plans.
Select to read species information for the western screech owl
Western Screech Owl
If you fear the dark, you will certainly appreciate the screech owl’s eerie, shivering nighttime wail. They nest in tree cavities, on rocky ledges, in farm sheds and in birdhouses. Visit the Western Screech Owl nest box page and view or print nest box plans.
Read species information for the pygmy owl
Pygmy Owl
Unlike other owls, pygmy owls are day hunters of small birds, rodents, reptiles and insects. They build nests in natural or abandoned tree cavities up to seventy five feet high and in nest boxes. Visit the pygmy owl nest box page and print nest box plans.
See species information for the boreal owl
Boreal Owl
Boreal owls are night hunters of small mammals and lesser quantities of birds. They nest in tree cavities and will also nest in birdhouses. Visit the boreal owl nest box page and view or print nest box plans.
See species information for the hawk owl
Hawk Owl
Has hawk like habits. Eats grouse, rodents, and insects. Hawk owls build nests in evergreen trees, in natural and abandoned tree cavities, sometimes in old hawk nests and in bird boxes too. Visit the hawk owl’s nest box page and view or print nest box plans.
Visit the species information page for saw-whet owl
Saw-whet Owls

Forages for beetles, ants, and grasshoppers, corn, acorns, berries and other wild fruit. Builds nests in cavities it excavates in trees, telephone poles, or fence posts and also nests in birdhouses. See the saw-whet owl nest box page and view or print nest box plans.

See species information for the barn owl
Barn Owl
Barn owls eat mice, rats and other mammals, insects, frogs, some birds, rarely poultry. They nest in tree hollows, deserted buildings, barns, boat wrecks, church towers, holes in banks, even holes in the open prairies. They also nest in large boxes in the right place.
See species information for the Kestrel
American Kestrel
The American kestrel builds no nest. It deposits its eggs in the natural or abandoned cavities of high trees and deserted magpie nests. Or in rock crevices and stone quarries and holes high in river banks. Near people in nooks of farm buildings and in cities in tall buildings like church steeples. They will also nest in the right size nest box in the right place. Visit the American kestrel nest box page and view or print the birdhouse plans.
See species information for the peregrine falcon
Peregrine Falcon
In the wild, peregrine falcons have generally nested on high, cliff edges, usually under some kind of overhang. They scrape out an area but add no nesting materials. In recent times, increasing numbers of peregrines nest on tall buildings, bridges and other structures in cities. Sometimes their nests on buildings are assisted by experts which may require training, qualification and licensing. These activities are generally regulated by Federal and State law.
Visit the red-tailed hawk species page
Red-tailed Hawk
Red-tailed hawks build nests high in trees, often more than 50 feet high. They use large sticks lined with smaller twigs, strips of bark, and its own feathers. Sometimes use a nest for many years. Sometimes red-tailed hawks will nest on a high mounted platform made especially for them. Visit the owl-hawk-osprey nesting platform page and view or print the nesting platform plans.
Visit the osprey species page.
Osprey
Ospreys build huge nests, often near other Osprey nests. They use large sticks, bones, seaweed, other bird nests and even old shoes. They nest in trees from ten to seventy five feet high, on the ground in colonies on isolated islands, and in parks and refuges. Residents of many towns accommodate ospreys with platforms. Visit the owl-hawk-osprey nesting platform page and view or print the platform plans.

Raptors that Nest
in Boxes & Platforms

Nine owl species, two falcons, a hawk and ospreys nest in boxes or platforms.

See species information for the Great Horned Owl
Great Horned Owl
Great horned owls build nests high in trees (as high as 100 feet) of sticks, twigs, bark and feathers in cavities, cliff ledges, other hawk or eagle nests and will also nest on specially made platforms.
See species information for the barred owl
Barred Owl
Barred owls hoot with an almost human like deep-toned voice. They often respond to an imitation of their call, try it. They nest in natural or abandoned tree cavities, abandoned crow or hawk nests and will also nest in birdhouses.
Select to read information for the eastern screech owl.
Eastern Screech Owl
Screech owls prey on mice, insects, frogs, snakes, lizards, crayfish and fish. They nest in natural or abandoned tree cavities, sometimes in barns, sheds and in nest boxes.
Select to read species information for the western screech owl
Western Screech Owl
If you fear of the dark, you will certainly appreciate the screech owl’s eerie, shivering nighttime wail. They nest in tree cavities, on rocky ledges, in farm sheds and in birdhouses.
Read species information for the pygmy owl
Pygmy Owl
Unlike other owls, pygmy owls are day hunters of small birds, rodents, reptiles and insects. They build nests in natural or abandoned tree cavities up to seventy five feet high and in nest boxes.
See species information for the boreal owl
Boreal Owl
Boreal owls are night hunters of small mammals and lesser quantities of birds. They nest in tree cavities and will also nest in birdhouses.
See species information for the hawk owl
Hawk Owl
Has hawk like habits. Eats grouse, rodents, and insects. Hawk owls build nests in evergreen trees, tree hollows, in natural and abandoned tree cavities, sometimes in old hawk nests and in bird boxes too.
Visit the species information page for saw-whet owl
Saw-whet Owls
Forages for beetles, ants, and grasshoppers, corn, acorns, berries and other wild fruit. Builds nests in cavities it excavates in trees, telephone poles, or fence posts and also nests in birdhouses.
See species information for the barn owl
Barn Owl
Barn owls eat mice, rats and other mammals, insects, frogs, some birds, rarely poultry. They nest in tree hollows, deserted buildings, barns, boat wrecks, church towers, holes in banks, even holes in the open prairies. They also nest in large boxes in the right places.
See species information for the Kestrel
American Kestrel
The American kestrel builds no nest. It deposits its eggs in the natural or abandoned cavities of high trees and deserted magpie nests. Or in rock crevices and stone quarries and holes high in river banks. Near people in nooks of farm buildings and in cities in tall buildings like church steeples. They will also nest in the right size nest box in the right place.
See species information for the peregrine falcon
Peregrine Falcon
In the wild, peregrine falcons have generally nested on high, cliff edges, usually under some kind of overhang.
They scrape out an area but add no nesting materials. In recent times, increasing numbers of peregrines nest on tall buildings, bridges and other structures in cities.
Sometimes their nests on buildings are assisted by experts which may require training, qualification and licensing. These activities are generally regulated by Federal and State law.
 
Visit the red-tailed hawk species page
Red-tailed Hawk
Red-tailed hawks build nests high in trees, often more than 50 feet high. They use large sticks lined with smaller twigs, strips of bark, and its own feathers. Sometimes use a nest for many years. Sometimes red-tailed hawks will nest on a high mounted platform made especially for them.
Visit the osprey species page.
Osprey
Ospreys build huge nests, often near other Osprey nests. They use large sticks, bones, seaweed, other bird nests and even old shoes. They nest in trees from ten to seventy five feet high, on the ground in colonies on isolated islands, and in parks and refuges. Residents of many towns accommodate ospreys with platforms.

Nest Boxes & Platforms

Building and installing nest boxes or large tall platforms involve dangerous heights and potential for serious injuries. Only professional trades workers should attempt these projects.

Select to view the barred owl nest box page.
Visit the Great Horned Owl Platform Page.
Visit the screech owl nest box page.
Visit the pygmy owl and saw-whet owl nest box page.
Visit the boreal owl nest box page.
Visit the hawk owl nest box page.

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