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70birds

That Nest in Birdhouses

70birds

That Nest in Birdhouses

70birds

That Nest in Birdhouses

See each species page for habits, geographic ranges and optimum locations and placement.

 

See the right birdhouse to build for each bird species at the Bird House Pages.

See which birds live near you and where they nest at the Bird Pages.

Print Birdhouse Plans with clear drawings and dimensions for each bird species.

 

Nest boxes simulate tree cavities.

Some birds that nest in tree cavities will also nest inside wood nest boxes if they are the right size.

Some birds that nest on tree branches, cliffs, and rock ledges will also nest on wood platforms.

Birds like birdhouses to be in their favorite places.

 

More than 70 North American bird species live in nest boxes or on platforms.

See which birds live near you. Learn about those birds and how to make birdhouses for them.

 

Boreal Owl

(Tengmalm’s Owl)

Aegolius funereus

Order: Strigiformes
Family: Strigidae
Genus: Aegolius
Species: funereus

La. strix  owl
La. strigis owl
La. forma form, shape, kind
La. -idae appearance, resemblance

Gr. aigolios bird of ill omen
La. aegolius night bird of prey
La. funus funeral
La. funereus deadly, mortal, fatal

About ten inches long with almost a two foot wingspan. Mostly pale facial disks with dark border.

Painting of a boreal owl perched on a tree branch.

Dark brown upper parts with large white spots. Pale underparts with large, dark irregular streaks. Yellow eyes. The Boreal Owl is most likely to be confused with the smaller Northern Saw-whet Owl but lacks brown in the face, has a pale bill, a dark border to the face and darker brown upper parts.

Map shows boreal owls range in central Alaska.
Boreal owls range circumpolar and inhabit coniferous and mixed hardwood forests in northern Europe, northern Asia, Alaska, and Canada.

Boreal owls range circumpolar and inhabit coniferous and mixed hardwood forests in northern Europe, northern Asia, Alaska, and Canada. They are most common in spruce or pine woods, although it is regularly found nesting in aspen in Minnesota.

​The first report of its nesting in the lower 48 states came from Minnesota in 1978. Since then a breeding population has been found in northeast Minnesota and local populations reported in Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado and Washington.

Boreal owls are night hunters of small mammals and lesser quantities of birds. They commonly perch in low tree branches and watch for passing prey.

Boreal owls nest in abandoned or natural cavities usually in coniferous trees, sometimes aspen. They also readily nest in the right size birdhouses in the right places.

Painting of a boreal owl perched on a fallen log with prey in its talons and foliage in the background.

Females lay three to six eggs and do most of the incubation while males forage. Eggs hatch after about four weeks incubation and young leave the nest in about another four or five weeks.

The Boreal Owl Nest Box has a 7″ by 7″ floor, 16″ inside floor to ceiling, a 2 1/2″ tall by 4 1/2″ wide entrance hole located 14″ above the floor and ventilation openings in the floor and under the roof.​

Assemble with corrosion resistant screws fit to pre-drilled countersunk pilot holes to reduce wood splitting.

A hinged roof can be secured with shutter hooks for easy access at significant heights, or a fixed roof and a Side Opening Door may be a more convenient and safer alternative.

Mount 10 feet or higher near woodland edges or clearings. Place a bed of wood chips on the floor, not saw dust which may retain moisture and mold growth.

Installations at significant heights should be installed by professionals, carpenters, electricians, power line workers, etc.

Visit the Boreal Owl Nest Box Page

Boreal Owl Nest Box

View or print the boreal owl nest box plans.

View/Print Plans

Although it is good practice to remove nests and clean boxes well after the brood rearing season is past, one might weigh the increased risks working at heights additional time(s) beyond the initial installation. Consider leaving the box, at least until a qualified trades worker is available.

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Boreal Owl

(Tengmalm’s Owl)

Aegolius funereus

Order: Strigiformes
Family: Strigidae
Genus: Aegolius
Species: funereus

La. strix  owl
La. strigis owl
La. forma form, shape, kind
La. -idae appearance, resemblance

Gr. aigolios bird of ill omen
La. aegolius night bird of prey
La. funus funeral
La. funereus deadly, mortal, fatal

About ten inches long with almost a two foot wingspan. Mostly pale facial disks with dark border.

Painting of a boreal owl perched on a tree branch.

Dark brown upper parts with large white spots. Pale underparts with large, dark irregular streaks. Yellow eyes. The Boreal Owl is most likely to be confused with the smaller Northern Saw-whet Owl but lacks brown in the face, has a pale bill, a dark border to the face and darker brown upper parts.

Map shows boreal owls range in central Alaska.
Boreal owls range circumpolar and inhabit coniferous and mixed hardwood forests in northern Europe, northern Asia, Alaska, and Canada.

Boreal owls range circumpolar and inhabit coniferous and mixed hardwood forests in northern Europe, northern Asia, Alaska, and Canada. They are most common in spruce or pine woods, although it is regularly found nesting in aspen in Minnesota.

The first report of its nesting in the lower 48 states came from Minnesota in 1978. Since then a breeding population has been found in northeast Minnesota and local populations reported in Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado and Washington.

The first report of its nesting in the lower 48 states came from Minnesota in 1978. Since then a breeding population has been found in northeast Minnesota and local populations reported in Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado and Washington.

Boreal owls are night hunters of small mammals and lesser quantities of birds. They commonly perch in low tree branches and watch for passing prey.

Boreal owls nest in abandoned or natural cavities usually in coniferous trees, sometimes aspen. They also readily nest in the right size birdhouses in the right places.

Painting of a boreal owl perched on a fallen log with prey in its talons and foliage in the background.

Females lay three to six eggs and do most of the incubation while males forage. Eggs hatch after about four weeks incubation and young leave the nest in about another four or five weeks.

The Boreal Owl Nest Box has a 7″ by 7″ floor, 16″ inside floor to ceiling, a 2 1/2″ tall by 4 1/2″ wide entrance hole located 14″ above the floor and ventilation openings in the floor and under the roof.

Assemble with corrosion resistant screws fit to pre-drilled countersunk pilot holes to reduce wood splitting.

A hinged roof can be secured with shutter hooks for easy access at significant heights, or a fixed roof and Side Opening Doors may be a more convenient and safer alternative.

Mount 10 feet or higher near woodland edges or clearings. Place a bed of wood chips on the floor, not saw dust which may retain moisture and mold growth.

Installations at significant heights should be installed and maintained by professionals, carpenters, electricians, power line workers, etc.

Visit the Boreal Owl Nest Box Page

Boreal Owl Nest Box

Select to view or print the boreal owl nest box plans.

Boreal Owl Nest Box Plans

Although it is good practice to remove nests and clean boxes well after the brood rearing season is past, one might weigh the increased risks working at heights additional time(s) beyond the initial installation. Consider leaving the box, at least until a qualified trades worker is available.

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Boreal Owl

(Tengmalm’s Owl)

Birds  |  Birdhouses  |  Plans  |  Home

Painting of a boreal owl perched on a tree branch.

Aegolius funereus

Order: Strigiformes
Family: Strigidae
Genus: Aegolius
Species: funereus

La. strix  owl
La. strigis owl
La. forma form, shape, kind
La. -idae appearance, resemblance

Gr. aigolios bird of ill omen
La. aegolius night bird of prey
La. funus funeral
La. funereus deadly, mortal, fatal

About ten inches long with almost a two foot wingspan. Mostly pale facial disks with dark border. Dark brown upper parts with large white spots. Pale underparts with large, dark irregular streaks. Yellow eyes.

The Boreal Owl is most likely to be confused with the smaller Northern Saw-whet Owl but lacks brown in the face, has a pale bill, a dark border to the face and darker brown upper parts.

Map shows boreal owls range in central Alaska.
Boreal owls range circumpolar and inhabit coniferous and mixed hardwood forests in northern Europe, northern Asia, Alaska, and Canada.

Boreal owls range circumpolar and inhabit coniferous and mixed hardwood forests in northern Europe, northern Asia, Alaska, and Canada. They are most common in spruce or pine woods, although it is regularly found nesting in aspen in Minnesota.

Painting of a boreal owl perched on a fallen log with prey in its talons and foliage in the background.

The first report of its nesting in the lower 48 states came from Minnesota in 1978. Since then a breeding population has been found in northeast Minnesota and local populations reported in Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado and Washington.

Boreal owls are night hunters of small mammals and lesser quantities of birds. They commonly perch in low tree branches and watch for passing prey.

Boreal owls nest in abandoned or natural cavities usually in coniferous trees, sometimes aspen. They also readily nest in the right size birdhouses in the right places.

Females lay three to six eggs and do most of the incubation while males forage. Eggs hatch after about four weeks incubation and young leave the nest in about another four or five weeks.

Visit the Boreal Owl Nest Box Page

Boreal Owl Nest Box

The Boreal Owl Nest Box has a 7″ by 7″ floor, 16″ inside floor to ceiling, a 2 1/2″ tall by 4 1/2″ wide entrance hole located 14″ above the floor and ventilation openings in the floor and under the roof.

Use wood stock that is rough cut on both sides for grip.

Drill countersunk pilot holes in primary work pieces and regular pilot holes in secondary work pieces to reduce wood splitting.

View or print the boreal owl nest box plans.

Boreal Owl Nest Box Plans

Assemble with corrosion resistant screws.

A hinged roof can be secured with shutter hooks for easy access at heights. Or a fixed roof and Side Opening Doors may be a more convenient and safer alternative.

Mount 10 feet or higher near woodland edges or clearings. Place a bed of wood chips on the floor, not saw dust which may retain moisture and mold growth.

Installations at significant heights should be installed and maintained by professionals, carpenters, electricians, power line workers, etc.

Although it is good practice to remove nests and clean boxes well after the brood rearing season is past, one might weigh the increased risks working at heights additional time(s) beyond the initial installation. Consider leaving the box, at least until a qualified trades worker is available.

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