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70birds

That Nest in Birdhouses

70birds

That Nest in Birdhouses

70birds

That Nest in Birdhouses

Put the right nest boxes in the right place.

Keep nest boxes clean.

Protect birds from pests and predators.

 

More than 70 North American bird species live in nest boxes or on platforms.

See which birds live near you. Learn about those birds and how to make birdhouses for them.

 

Feeding birds will not attract birds to nest and raise a family in a bird house.

Nesting, egg laying birds need seclusion and are unlikely to nest in a bird house near throngs of birds flocking to bird feeders.

 

Too many bird houses can drive off nesting birds, including a specific bird species we want to attract.

For most yards, select just one or two bird species that are known to nest in bird houses in that region.

 

Order: Strigiformes
Family: Strigidae
Genus: Aegolius
Species: acadicus

La. strix  owl
La. strigis owl
La. forma form, shape, kind

La. -idae appearance, resemblance
La. aegolius night bird of prey
La. Acadia former French colony in Nova Scotia

About eight inches long. Dark cinnamon brown with white streaks on upper parts and white with cinnamon brown streaks on underside.

Painting of a saw-whet owl perched in a coniferous tree.

Buff white facial disk with black outline around yellow eyes. Three or four narrow white bands on the tail.

Saw-whet owls inhabit the northern latitudes around the globe and sparsely populate scattered areas in middle US, Canada and Alaska and in the southwest mountainous regions as far Mexico.

Saw-whet owls inhabit dense coniferous forests, groves and tree stands in farms and towns from the middle U.S. north to Canada and Alaska and in the southwest mountainous regions as far Mexico in the winter. Like its cousin, the Boreal Owl, it inhabits the northern latitudes around the globe.

They are night hunters for mice and insects. Its note resembles the filing of a saw.

Saw-whet owls make nests of loose chips and feathers in natural or abandoned tree cavities, rock clefts, sometimes in abandoned squirrel, crow or heron nests, in building towers and in bird houses which have been used for hundreds of years for rodent control.

Females lay three to seven white eggs which hatch after about four weeks incubation and young leave the nest in another four to five weeks.

The Saw-whet Owl Birdhouse (same as for Pigmy Owl, Lewis’s Woodpecker, Northern Flicker, and Grackle) has a 7″ by 7″ floor, 16″ inside ceiling, 2 1/2″ diameter entrance hole located 14″ above the floor and ventilation openings.

Secure a hinged roof with shutter hooks for easy access or consider a fixed roof and Side Opening Doors if it may be a more convenient and a safer alternative.

Mount this birdhouse out of reach (10 feet or higher) near woodland edges or clearings.

Place a bed of wood chips, not sawdust, on the floor. Remove everything from the nest box and clean well after the brood rearing season.

Installations at significant heights should be installed and maintained by professionals, carpenters, electricians, power line workers, etc.

Other owls and woodpeckers also may use this nest box.

Visit the saw-whet owl birdhouse page.

Saw-whet Owl Nest Box

Select to view or print saw-whet owl birdhouse plans.

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Order: Strigiformes
Family: Strigidae
Genus: Aegolius
Species: acadicus

La. strix  owl
La. strigis owl
La. forma form, shape, kind

La. -idae appearance, resemblance
La. aegolius night bird of prey
La. Acadia former French colony in Nova Scotia

About eight inches long. Dark cinnamon brown with white streaks on upper parts and white with cinnamon brown streaks on underside.

Painting of a saw-whet owl perched in a coniferous tree.

Saw-whet owls inhabit dense coniferous forests, groves and tree stands in farms and towns from the middle U.S. north to Canada and Alaska and in the southwest mountainous regions as far Mexico in the winter. Like its cousin, the Boreal Owl, it inhabits the northern latitudes around the globe.

Saw-whet owls inhabit the northern latitudes around the globe and sparsely populate scattered areas in middle US, Canada and Alaska and in the southwest mountainous regions as far Mexico.

They are night hunters for mice and insects. Its note resembles the filing of a saw.

Saw-whet owls make nests of loose chips and feathers in natural or abandoned tree cavities, rock clefts, sometimes in abandoned squirrel, crow or heron nests, in building towers and in bird houses which have been used for hundreds of years for rodent control.

Females lay three to seven white eggs which hatch after about four weeks incubation and young leave the nest in another four to five weeks.

The Saw-whet Owl Birdhouse (same as for Pigmy Owl, Lewis’s Woodpecker, Northern Flicker, and Grackle) has a 7″ by 7″ floor, 16″ inside ceiling, 2 1/2″ diameter entrance hole located 14″ above the floor and ventilation openings.

Secure a hinged roof with shutter hooks for easy access or consider a fixed roof and Side Opening Doors if it may be a more convenient and a safer alternative.

Mount this birdhouse out of reach (10 feet or higher) near woodland edges or clearings.

Place a bed of wood chips, not sawdust, on the floor. Remove everything from the nest box and clean well after the brood rearing season.

Installations at significant heights should be installed and maintained by professionals, carpenters, electricians, power line workers, etc.

Other owls and woodpeckers also may use this nest box.

Visit the Saw-whet Owl Nest Box Page.

Saw-whet Owl Birdhouse

Select to view or print owl woodpecker grackle birdhouse plans.

Saw-whet Owl Birdhouse Plans

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Saw-whet Owl

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Painting of a saw-whet owl perched in a coniferous tree.

Order: Strigiformes
Family: Strigidae
Genus: Aegolius
Species: acadicus

La. strix  owl
La. strigis owl
La. forma form, shape, kind

La. -idae appearance, resemblance
La. aegolius night bird of prey
La. Acadia former French colony in Nova Scotia

About eight inches long.

Dark cinnamon brown with white streaks on upper parts and white with cinnamon brown streaks on underside.

Saw-whet owls inhabit the northern latitudes around the globe and sparsely populate scattered areas in middle US, Canada and Alaska and in the southwest mountainous regions as far Mexico.

Saw-whet owls inhabit dense coniferous forests, groves and tree stands in farms and towns from the middle U.S. north to Canada and Alaska and in the southwest mountainous regions as far Mexico in the winter. Like its cousin, the Boreal Owl, it inhabits the northern latitudes around the globe.

They are night hunters for mice and insects. Its note resembles the filing of a saw.

Saw-whet owls make nests of loose chips and feathers in natural or abandoned tree cavities, rock clefts, sometimes in abandoned squirrel, crow or heron nests, in building towers and in bird houses which have been used for hundreds of years for rodent control.

Females lay three to seven white eggs which hatch after about four weeks incubation and young leave the nest in another four to five weeks.

Visit the Saw-whet Owl Birdhouse Page

Saw-whet Owl Nest Box

The Saw-whet Owl Birdhouse (same as for Pigmy Owl, Lewis’s Woodpecker, Northern Flicker, and Grackle) has a 7″ by 7″ floor, 16″ inside ceiling, 2 1/2″ diameter entrance hole located 14″ above the floor and ventilation openings.

Secure hinged roof with shutter hooks for easy access or consider a fixed roof and Side Opening Doors if it may be a more convenient and safer alternative.

Select to view or print owl woodpecker grackle birdhouse plans.

Saw-whet Owl Nest Box Plans

Mount this birdhouse out of reach (10 feet or higher) near woodland edges or clearings.

Place a bed of wood chips, not sawdust, on the floor. Remove everything from the nest box and clean well after the brood rearing season.

Installations at significant heights should be installed and maintained by professionals, carpenters, electricians, power line workers, etc.

Birds  |  Birdhouses  |  Plans  |   Home