70birds

That Nest in Birdhouses

70birds

That Nest in Birdhouses

70birds

That Nest in Birdhouses

Brown Creeper

Order: Passeriformes
Family: Certhiidae
Genus: Certhia
Species: americana

La. passer sparrow, small bird
La. forma form, kind, species
Gr. kerthios small, tree dwelling bird

La certhius a creeper
La. -idae appearance, resemblance
La. americana for the American continent

About five inches long. Camouflaged with irregular brown and ashy white stripes, the wings being somewhat barred.

Long brown tail, rigid like a woodpecker’s tail. Buff white underside. Long, thin bill with a pronounced downward curve.

Brown creepers can be found in coniferous and mixed forests, groves and wooded farms and towns.

Brown creepers range in North America from Appalachia, New England and the Great Lakes regions north into the Canadian Provinces and from southwest U.S. to Northern British Columbia, Alberta and southern Alaska. They winter throughout most of the U.S. and southern Canada.

The high-pitched song of the brown creeper might not be associated with the bird because it often isn’t seen. They are well camouflaged and inconspicuous yet very active birds.

If seen they are usually creeping in quick short movements up tree trunks or flying to the base of another, foraging in bark crevices and on the surface for beetles, spiders, aphids, ants, caterpillars, leafhoppers and insect larvae and eggs.

Brown creepers also eat pine cone seeds, various other small seeds and suet at feeders usually in cold seasons.

During winters, feed brown creepers suet, peanut butter, pine cone seeds, tiny nut meats and various other tiny seeds.

Brown creepers build nests by cramming twigs, fine bark strips, feathers, moss and spider cocoons behind the loose bark of dead tree trunks or stumps and in natural or abandoned tree cavities being somewhat particular to balsam firs.

They can also be attracted to birdhouses. Like nuthatches, they are somewhat more inclined to nest in rustic and bark covered bird houses.

Females lay four to eight creamy-white speckled eggs which hatch after about two weeks incubation and offspring leave the nest in about another two weeks.

The Brown Creeper Birdhouse (same as for house wrens, winter wrens and Bewick’s wrens) has a 4″ by 4″ floor, 8″ inside floor to ceiling, 1 1/4″ diameter entrance hole located 6″ above the floor and ventilation openings.

Brown Creeper Birdhouse

For brown creepers, use wood stock that is rough-cut on both sides and cover the exterior of this box with tree bark.

Assemble the box with corrosion resistant screws fit to pre-drilled pilot holes and secure a hinged roof with shutter hooks.

Visit the Brown Creeper Birdhouse Page.
Brown Creeper Birdhouse
Print or just view brown creeper birdhouse plansBrown Creeper Birdhouse Plans

Mount on a tree or post in a secluded area in the woods between four and ten feet high with partial sun and shade. Remove the nest and clean the box after the brood rearing seasons are over.

​Chickadees, Titmice, Nuthatches, Downy Woodpeckers and wrens may also use this box.

Home          Birds           Birdhouses          Birdhouse Plans        Birdhouse Forum

Order: Passeriformes
Family: Certhiidae
Genus: Certhia
Species: americana

La. passer sparrow, small bird
La. forma form, kind, species
Gr. kerthios small, tree dwelling bird

La certhius a creeper
La. -idae appearance, resemblance
La. americana for the American continent

About five inches long. Camouflaged with irregular brown and ashy white stripes, the wings being somewhat barred.

Long brown tail, rigid like a woodpecker’s tail. Buff white underside. Long, thin bill with a pronounced downward curve.

Brown creepers can be found in coniferous and mixed forests, groves and wooded farms and towns.

Brown creepers range in North America from Appalachia, New England and the Great Lakes regions north into the Canadian Provinces and from southwest U.S. to Northern British Columbia, Alberta and southern Alaska. They winter throughout most of the U.S. and southern Canada.

The high-pitched song of the brown creeper might not be associated with the bird because it often isn’t seen. They are well camouflaged and inconspicuous yet very active birds.

If seen they are usually creeping in quick short movements up tree trunks or flying to the base of another, foraging in bark crevices and on the surface for beetles, spiders, aphids, ants, caterpillars, leafhoppers and insect larvae and eggs.

Brown creepers also eat pine cone seeds, various other small seeds and suet at feeders usually in cold seasons.

Feed brown creepers suet, peanut butter, pine cone seeds, tiny nut meats and various other tiny seeds.

Brown creepers build nests by cramming twigs, fine bark strips, feathers, moss and spider cocoons behind the loose bark of dead tree trunks or stumps and in natural or abandoned tree cavities being somewhat particular to balsam firs.

They can also be attracted to birdhouses. Like nuthatches, they are somewhat more inclined to nest in rustic and bark covered bird houses.

Females lay four to eight creamy-white speckled eggs which hatch after about two weeks incubation and offspring leave the nest in about another two weeks.

The Brown Creeper Birdhouse (same as for house wrens, winter wrens and Bewick’s wrens) has a 4″ by 4″ floor, 8″ inside floor to ceiling, 1 1/4″ diameter entrance hole located 6″ above the floor and ventilation openings.

Brown Creeper Birdhouse

For brown creepers, use wood stock that is rough-cut on both sides and cover the exterior of this box with tree bark.

Assemble the box with corrosion resistant screws fit to pre-drilled pilot holes and secure a hinged roof with shutter hooks.

Visit the Brown Creeper Birdhouse Page.
Brown Creeper
Birdhouse
Print or just view brown creeper birdhouse plans
Brown Creeper
Birdhouse Plans

Mount on a tree or post in a secluded area in the woods between four and ten feet high with partial sun and shade. Remove the nest and clean the box after the brood rearing seasons are over.

Chickadees, Titmice, Nuthatches, Downy Woodpeckers and wrens may also use this box.

Home            Birds             Birdhouses            Birdhouse Plans          Birdhouse Forum

Brown Thrasher

Birds  |  Birdhouses  |  Plans  |  Home

Order: Passeriformes
Family: Certhiidae
Genus: Certhia
Species: americana

La. passer sparrow, small bird
La. forma form, kind, species
Gr. kerthios small, tree dwelling bird

La certhius a creeper
La. -idae appearance, resemblance
La. americana for the American continent

About five inches long. Camouflaged with irregular brown and ashy white stripes, the wings being somewhat barred.

Long brown tail, rigid like a woodpecker’s tail. Buff white underside. Long, thin bill with a pronounced downward curve.

Brown creepers can be found in coniferous and mixed forests, groves and wooded farms and towns.

Brown creepers range in North America from Appalachia, New England and the Great Lakes regions north into the Canadian Provinces and from southwest U.S. to Northern British Columbia, Alberta and southern Alaska. They winter throughout most of the U.S. and southern Canada.

The high-pitched song of the brown creeper might not be associated with the bird because it often isn’t seen. They are well camouflaged and inconspicuous yet very active birds.

If seen they are usually creeping in quick short movements up tree trunks or flying to the base of another, foraging in bark crevices and on the surface for beetles, spiders, aphids, ants, caterpillars, leafhoppers and insect larvae and eggs.

Brown creepers also eat pine cone seeds, various other small seeds and suet at feeders usually in cold seasons.

Feed brown creepers suet, peanut butter, pine cone seeds, tiny nut meats and various other tiny seeds.

Brown creepers build nests by cramming twigs, fine bark strips, feathers, moss and spider cocoons behind the loose bark of dead tree trunks or stumps and in natural or abandoned tree cavities being somewhat particular to balsam firs.

They can also be attracted to birdhouses. Like nuthatches, they are somewhat more inclined to nest in rustic and bark covered bird houses.

Females lay four to eight creamy-white speckled eggs which hatch after about two weeks incubation and offspring leave the nest in about another two weeks.

Brown Creeper Birdhouse

The Brown Creeper Birdhouse (same as for house wrens, winter wrens and Bewick’s wrens) has a 4″ by 4″ floor, 8″ inside floor to ceiling, 1 1/4″ diameter entrance hole located 6″ above the floor and ventilation openings.

For brown creepers, use wood stock that is rough-cut on both sides and cover the exterior of this box with tree bark.

Brown Creeper Birdhouse Plans

Assemble the box with corrosion resistant screws fit to pre-drilled pilot holes and secure a hinged roof with shutter hooks.

Mount on a tree or post in a secluded area in the woods between four and ten feet high with partial sun and shade. Remove the nest and clean the box after the brood rearing seasons are over.

Chickadees, Titmice, Nuthatches, Downy Woodpeckers and wrens may also use this box.

Birds  |  Birdhouses  |  Plans  |  Forum