70birds

That Nest in Birdhouses

70birds

That Nest in Birdhouses

70birds

That Nest in Birdhouses

Bewick’s Wren

Thryothorus bewickii

Order: Passeriformes
Family: Troglodytidae
Genus: Thryothorus
Species: bewickii

La. passer sparrow, small bird
La. forma form, kind, species
Gr. trogle hole or hollow
Gr. dutes burrower

Cr. troglodutes cave dweller
Gr. thruon a reed
Gr. thouros leaping
La. bewickii for Thomas Bewick

Bewick's wren perched on a bush twig with shrubbery and leaves in a foggy background

About five inches long. Dark cinnamon-brown upper, gray-white undersides, darker wings and tail. Central tail feathers barred. Thin white streak from the beak, over the eye, to the back of the head.​

Barred tail with white edges a little longer than the House Wren. Typical hunkered down wren stance with upright tail when alerted. 

USGS map shows the breeding range of Bewick's wren on the West Coast and southern US.

Bewick’s wrens inhabit forest edges, groves, orchards, farms, towns, back yards and gardens from southwestern British Columbia to southern California, Nevada and Mexico, east to Texas, Oklahoma and Missouri, and are some less densely populated through most of Tennessee and Kentucky, south to Florida and as far north as Ohio and Pennsylvania.

Bewick's wren song written to sheet music

Male Bewick’s wrens sing a number of songs they learn from their neighbors to announce their territory and attract mates. They have sharp alarm notes and scold intruders.

Bewick’s wrens forage through trees, underbrush, thickets, in rock piles and on the ground for beetles, ants, wasps various other insects and their eggs, spiders and seeds.

Feed Bewick’s wrens mealworms, suet and suet mixes, peanut butter, shelled sunflower seeds, tiny nut meats and bread crumbs.

Attract Bewick’s wrens. Plant various cover and berry producing shrubbery which they will sometimes sample. Leave piles of fallen shrubs, left uncut on the ground which will provide cover for them and the insects they eat.

Bewick’s wrens build nests of almost any material, twigs, grass, leaves, paper, moss, strips of bark and other hairy materials. 

Usually they nest very low in natural or abandoned tree cavities, brush heaps, under bushes and very often in open sheds and the right bird houses in the right places.

Beautiful black and white drawing of Bewick's wren on a tree branch.

Females lay around five to six, more or less, speckled pinkish or white eggs which hatch after about two weeks incubation and young leave the nest in about another two weeks. They often raise two broods in a season.

The Bewick’s Wren Birdhouse (same as for house wrens, winter wrens and brown creepers) has a 4″ by 4″ floor, 8″ inside ceiling, 1 1/4″ diameter entrance hole located 6″ above the floor and ventilation openings.

Assemble with screws fit to pre-drilled pilot holes and secure hinged roof with shutter hooks.

Mount or hang from a tree branch or under an eave or mount on a fence or on a wall from four (in more secluded spots) to out of reach if necessary with partial sun and shade.

Because male wrens tend to build several nests for the female to choose from, hang several nest boxes in secluded areas spread not to close to each other.

Chickadees, Titmice, Nuthatches, Downy Woodpeckers and other wrens may also use this box.

Birdhouse made with rough cut cedar, corrosion resistant screws and brass hinges and shutter hooks.

Wren Nest Box

Select to view and print wren house plans

Wren Nest Box Plans

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Bewick’s Wren

Thryothorus bewickii

Order: Passeriformes
Family: Troglodytidae
Genus: Thryothorus
Species: bewickii

La. passer sparrow, small bird
La. forma form, kind, species
Gr. trogle hole or hollow
Gr. dutes burrower

Cr. troglodutes cave dweller
Gr. thruon a reed
Gr. thouros leaping
La. bewickii for Thomas Bewick

Bewick's wren perched on a bush twig with shrubbery and leaves in a foggy background

About five inches long. Dark cinnamon-brown upper, gray-white undersides, darker wings and white-tipped tail. Central tail feathers barred. Thin white streak from the beak, over the eye, to the back of the head.

Typical hunkered down wren stance with upright tail when alerted. Barred tail with white edges a little longer than the House Wren.

Map showing range of Bewick's wrens

Bewick’s wrens inhabit forest edges, groves, orchards, farms, towns, back yards and gardens from southwestern British Columbia to southern California, Nevada and Mexico, east to Texas, Oklahoma and Missouri, and are some less densely populated through most of Tennessee and Kentucky, south to Florida and as far north as Ohio and Pennsylvania.

Bewick's wren song written to sheet music

Male Bewick’s wrens sing a number various songs they learn from their neighbors to claim their territory and attract a mate. They have sharp alarm notes and scold intruders.

Bewick’s wrens forage through trees, underbrush, thickets, in rock piles and on the ground for beetles, ants, wasps various other insects and their eggs, spiders and seeds.

Feed Bewick’s wrens mealworms, suet and suet mixes, peanut butter, shelled sunflower seeds, tiny nut meats and bread crumbs.

Attract Bewick’s wrens. Plant various cover and berry producing shrubbery which they will sometimes sample.

Leave piles of fallen shrubs, left uncut on the ground which will provide cover for them and the insects they eat.

Bewick’s wrens build nests of almost any material, twigs, grass, leaves, paper, moss, strips of bark and other hairy materials.

Usually they nest very low in natural or abandoned tree cavities, brush heaps, under bushes, in open sheds and the right bird houses in the right places.

Beautiful black and white drawing of Bewick's wren on a tree branch.

Females lay around five to six, more or less, speckled pinkish or white eggs which hatch after about two weeks incubation and young leave the nest in about another two weeks. They often raise two broods in a season.

The Bewick’s Wren Birdhouse (same as for house wrens, winter wrens and brown creepers) has a 4″ by 4″ floor, 8″ inside ceiling, 1 1/4″ diameter entrance hole located 6″ above the floor and ventilation openings.

Assemble with screws fit to pre-drilled pilot holes and secure hinged roof with shutter hooks.

Mount or hang from a tree branch or under an eave or mount on a fence or on a wall from four (in more secluded spots) to out of reach if necessary with partial sun and shade.

Because male wrens tend to build several nests for the female to choose from, hang several nest boxes in secluded areas spread not to close to each other.

Chickadees, Titmice, Nuthatches, Downy Woodpeckers and other wrens may also use this box.

Birdhouse made with rough cut cedar, corrosion resistant screws and brass hinges and shutter hooks.

Wren Nest Box

View and print birdhouse plans for wrens and brown creepers.

Wren Nest Box Plans

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Bewick’s Wren

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Bewick's wren perched on a bush twig with shrubbery and leaves in a foggy background

Thryothorus bewickii

Order: Passeriformes
Family: Troglodytidae
Genus: Thryothorus
Species: bewickii

La. passer sparrow, small bird
La. forma form, kind, species
Gr. trogle hole or hollow
Gr. dutes burrower

Cr. troglodutes cave dweller
Gr. thruon a reed
Gr. thouros leaping
La. bewickii for Thomas Bewick

About five inches long. Dark cinnamon-brown upper, gray-white undersides, darker wings and white-tipped tail. Central tail feathers barred. Thin white streak from the beak, over the eye, to the back of the head.

Typical hunkered down wren stance with upright tail when alerted. Barred tail with white edges a little longer than the House Wren.

Map showing range of Bewick's wrens

Bewick’s wrens inhabit forest edges, groves, orchards, farms, towns, back yards and gardens from southwestern British Columbia to southern California, Nevada and Mexico, east to Texas, Oklahoma and Missouri, and are some less densely populated through most of Tennessee and Kentucky, south to Florida and as far north as Ohio and Pennsylvania.

Male Bewick’s wrens sing a number various songs they learn from their neighbors to claim their territory and attract a mate. They have sharp alarm notes and scold intruders.

Bewick's wren song written to sheet music

Bewick’s wrens forage through trees, underbrush, thickets, in rock piles and on the ground for beetles, ants, wasps various other insects and their eggs, spiders and seeds.

Feed Bewick’s wrens mealworms, suet and suet mixes, peanut butter, shelled sunflower seeds, tiny nut meats and bread crumbs.

Beautiful black and white drawing of Bewick's wren on a tree branch.

Attract Bewick’s wrens. Plant various cover and berry producing shrubbery which they will sometimes sample. Leave piles of fallen shrubs, left uncut on the ground which will provide cover for them and the insects they eat.

Bewick’s wrens build nests of almost any material, twigs, grass, leaves, paper, moss, strips of bark and other hairy materials.

Usually they nest very low in natural or abandoned tree cavities, brush heaps, under bushes and very often in open sheds and the right bird houses in the right places.

Females lay around five to six, more or less, speckled pinkish or white eggs which hatch after about two weeks incubation and young leave the nest in about another two weeks. They often raise two broods in a season.

Birdhouse made with rough cut cedar, corrosion resistant screws and brass hinges and shutter hooks.

Wren Nest Box

The Bewick’s Wren Birdhouse (same as for house wrens, winter wrens and brown creepers) has a 4″ by 4″ floor, 8″ inside ceiling, 1 1/4″ diameter entrance hole located 6″ above the floor and ventilation openings.

Assemble with screws fit to pre-drilled pilot holes and secure hinged roof with shutter hooks.

Select to view and print wren house plans.

Wren Nest Box Plans

Mount or hang from a tree branch or under an eave or mount on a fence or on a wall from four (in more secluded spots) to out of reach if necessary with partial sun and shade.

Because male wrens tend to build several nests for the female to choose from, hang several nest boxes in secluded areas spread not to close to each other.

Chickadees, Titmice, Nuthatches, Downy Woodpeckers and other wrens may also use this box.

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