Lewis’s Woodpecker

Order: Piciformes
Family: Picidae
Genus: Melanerpes
Species: lewis

Gr. pikos woodpecker
La. picus woodpecker
Gr. Circe mythological daughter of Helios, changed Picus, son of Saturn, into a woodpecker
La. forma form, shape, kind
La. -idae appearance, resemblance
Gr. melas black
Gr. herpes a creeper
La. lewis for Meriwether Lewis

A large woodpecker; 10 – 11 inches long. Upper parts, wings and tail green black with bronze luster.

Dark crimson face. Narrow distinct collar around back of neck.

Bluish gray breast. Pink underside. Resembles a Crow in flight.

Painting of a Lewis's woodpecker perched on a decayed tree trunk with a coniferous forest in a valley and snow capped mountain in the background.
Inhabits coniferous and mixed forests, groves and scattered trees throughout west of the Great Plains to the Pacific, north to Alberta and British Columbia, east to the Big Horn Mountains of Montana and Wyoming, Black Hills of South Dakota and the Colorado Plains, south to Arizona and New Mexico.
USGS map shows Lewis's woodpeckers range in forested mountains in western US and southwestern Canada.
Lewis’s woodpeckers were identified by the Lewis and Clark Expedition near Helena, Montana in 1804.
Unlike other woodpeckers, Lewis’s woodpeckers fly in straight paths with consistent laborious wing movements.

They forage for insects under the bark of trees and catch them in flight. Also eat fruit and nuts.

Like red-headed woodpeckers, they store nuts which they wedge into bark crevices and cracks.

Females lay six to eight, more or less, white eggs which hatch after about two weeks incubation and young leave the nest in about another four weeks.

They excavate tree cavities often in coniferous trees as much as two feet deep at heights from chest level up to extreme heights.

Painting of Lewis's woodpecker perched atop a decayed tree trunk with wooded mountain foothills in the background.
The Lewis’s Woodpecker Birdhouse (same as for the Flicker, Pigmy Owl, Saw-Whet Owl, and Grackle) has a 7″ by 7″ floor, 16″ inside ceiling, 2 1/2″ diameter entrance hole located 14″ above the floor and ventilation openings.
Secure a hinged roof with shutter hooks for easy access. Fill the box with wood chips, not sawdust.

Mount this nest box 12 feet or higher on a tree at a forest edge, or grove.

Installations at significant heights should be installed and maintained by professionals, carpenters, electricians, power line workers, etc.

Other woodpeckers and owls also may use this nest box.

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Lewis’s Woodpecker

Painting of a Lewis's woodpecker perched on a decayed tree trunk with a coniferous forest in a valley and snow capped mountain in the background.
Order: Piciformes
Family: Picidae
Genus: Melanerpes
Species: lewis

Gr. pikos woodpecker
La. picus woodpecker
Gr. Circe mythological daughter of Helios, changed Picus, son of Saturn, into a woodpecker
La. forma form, shape, kind
La. -idae appearance, resemblance
Gr. melas black
Gr. herpes a creeper
La. lewis for Meriwether Lewis

A large woodpecker; 10 – 11 inches long. Upper parts, wings and tail green black with bronze luster.

Dark crimson face. Narrow distinct collar around back of neck.

Bluish gray breast. Pink underside. Resembles a Crow in flight.

USGS map shows Lewis's woodpeckers range in forested mountains in western US and southwestern Canada.
Inhabits coniferous and mixed forests, groves and scattered trees throughout west of the Great Plains to the Pacific, north to Alberta and British Columbia, east to the Big Horn Mountains of Montana and Wyoming, Black Hills of South Dakota and the Colorado Plains, south to Arizona and New Mexico.
Lewis’s woodpeckers were identified by the Lewis and Clark Expedition near Helena, Montana in 1804.
Painting of Lewis's woodpecker perched atop a decayed tree trunk with wooded mountain foothills in the background.
Unlike other woodpeckers, Lewis’s woodpeckers fly in straight paths with consistent laborious wing movements.

They forage for insects under the bark of trees and catch them in flight. Also eat fruit and nuts.

Like red-headed woodpeckers, they store nuts which they wedge into bark crevices and cracks.

Females lay six to eight, more or less, white eggs which hatch after about two weeks incubation and young leave the nest in about another four weeks.

They excavate tree cavities often in coniferous trees as much as two feet deep at heights from chest level up to extreme heights.

The Lewis’s Woodpecker Birdhouse (same as for the Flicker, Pigmy Owl, Saw-Whet Owl, and Grackle) has a 7″ by 7″ floor, 16″ inside ceiling, 2 1/2″ diameter entrance hole located 14″ above the floor and ventilation openings.

Painting of Lewis's woodpecker perched atop a decayed tree trunk with wooded mountain foothills in the background.
Secure a hinged roof with shutter hooks for easy access. Fill the box with wood chips, not sawdust.

Mount this nest box 12 feet or higher on a tree at a forest edge, or grove.

Installations at significant heights should be installed and maintained by professionals, carpenters, electricians, power line workers, etc.

Other woodpeckers and owls also may use this nest box.

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